Chania

Crete

 

Leaving Heraklion, we picked up a rental car and drove west along the north coast, past typical Cretian countryside ...

 

... and a number of seaside resorts ...

 

... and this well-maintained church in the middle of nowhere.

 

We stopped off at Rethymnon, about halfway between Heraklion and Chania, and parked close to this minaret.

 

Rethymnon has a large and interesting Venetian fortress, with strong walls.

 

The fortress' main gate.

 

After the Venetians were defeated by the Turks, a mosque was build inside the fortress.

 

View along the coast from the fortress.

 

We wandered around the streets of Rethymnon ...

 

... before having some lunch. Note the Venetian woodwork on the right-hand building.

 

Driving into Chania, I was surprised that we managed to find our hotel without difficulty. It was very pleasant: Art Deco outside, modern inside, helpful staff, and close to the Old Town.

 

The entry to the harbour at Chania is guarded by this old lighthouse.

 

A mosque on the waterfront, with a horse and carriage waiting in hope of tourists.

 

The Chania waterfront by day ...

 

... and by night. Lynn had her worst meal ever at one of these restaurants.

 

Many parts of the old town are very attractive.

 

 

 

However, Chania was severely damaged during WW2 and some parts had still not been repaired.

 

In some buildings, the ground floor had been turned into an upmarket shop while the upper floor stayed a wreck.

 

Returning to Heraklion, we detoured into the Akrotiri Peninsula and visited the Agia Triada Monastery.

 

And then the Commonwealth War Cemetery at Soudha

 

 

 

Combatants from both sides are buried there.

Then it was a quick trip to Heraklion airport, and off to Rhodes.

 

Copyright © 2002 by Lynn or Nick Booth.